Marianne Avila - Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Verani Realty



Posted by Marianne Avila on 11/8/2020

Photo by Fotocraft via Shutterstock

Many homeowners spend thousands of dollars on improvements and upgrades only to find out that the return on their investment (ROI) is less than $1 to $1. That means that for every dollar spent, the selling price of their home does not go up a corresponding dollar. In fact, very few home improvements offer a dollar for dollar increase in price.

What some improvements accomplish, however, is a reduction of time that your home spends on the market. When calculating overall costs, a quicker sale can save you several additional mortgage payments on your home.

In-Home Improvements

If you intend to live in the house for some time, make the improvements that give you pleasure in your home. Renovate the house to meet your needs and improve your life. If you’re renovating just to sell, unless you bought the home as the lowest-priced house in a highly desirable market, redoing the kitchen and bath won’t always pay for themselves. However, they will make the home more attractive to buyers and give you a leg up on the competition.

Adding a room and increasing square-footage usually improves the home’s value. This means converting an attic or basement might be a better use of your funds. Adding a second bathroom also garners a buyer’s attention. But turning a garage into a family room could backfire on you if buyers treasure a garage more than the extra space. Before undertaking a garage conversion, speak with a knowledgeable real estate agent in that area to see which option buyers most often request.

Curb appeal Improvements

When choosing improvements for resale, adding to the curb appeal gives you the most bang for your buck. Replace street-view garage doors with carriage-house style or modern minimalist options and update the front door to match. Clean out flower beds, replant them, and trim them with stone edging. Keep bushes and hedges trimmed and prune trees to keep them healthy.

Circulation Improvements

Old homes in areas where air conditioning was an afterthought benefit from adding attic fans and insulation to improve the cooling properties. Also, when possible, install a whole house fan (different from an attic fan) as it offers superior circulation for a small investment and makes the lack of central air conditioning less noticeable.

Your professional real estate agent is your best resource to learn what’s selling in homes in your neighborhood.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Marianne Avila on 9/22/2019

Homeowners make changes and improvements to their property for several reasons including to increase aesthetic appeal, provide mechanical upgrades, and boost the house's value. Regardless of your intentions, it is vital to know what your home needs so that you don't end up undertaking a project that is a waste of money and adds little utility or value. 

Before starting any house renovation project, make sure you carry out thorough research to see what improvements can raise your property value. Check out these home upgrades that would cost you a pretty penny but offer low returns when it is time to sell your home. 

Built-in aquariums

Building an aquarium into the wall or cabinets of your home will make your home look beautiful. However, these stunning upgrades can turn off potential buyers because not everyone wants to deal with the high cost of maintenance.

Swimming pool

As expensive as it is to install a swimming pool, it does not significantly increase the value of your property. A swimming pool requires constant attention and many home buyers can't deal with the upkeep. Apart from the high maintenance, home buyers that have little children see pools as a potential danger because of the fear of drowning accidents.

Built-in electronics

Having a floor-to-ceiling media center may look stunning and fit your love for big screens and entertainment, but some potential buyers may view it as a drain of energy costs and a waste of space. A high-end surround sound system or home theater doesn't work for everyone and may limit your pool of potential buyers. Besides, electronics change year to year, so anything you install will be out of date by the time you sell.

Home office

Even though freelancing is now common, and everybody seems to be working from home, adding a home office is a bad idea. Prospective buyers may be turned off by a room that can't function or substitute as an extra bedroom. However, if there is already a home office, keep the room simple; a chair, desk and good lighting are enough. Keeping the area simple will allow buyers to visualize the place for another purpose easily.

Luxurious bathroom 

Adding waterfall showers, imported tiles, hot tubs, steam room, or a sauna will cost you a lot of money but rather than attracting buyers, these luxuries will scare off many of them. You should consider doing more in the kitchen to which more buyers are likely to pay attention.

Installing an over-the-top chandelier

Every buyer wants to buy a home with bright light, but if you empty your wallet buying an expensive chandelier, you probably won't get a dime back. Chandeliers are something of a personal choice. You may spend thousands of dollars to install it, only to have it removed after you sold your home.

Consult your real estate agent to find out what home improvements are in high demand in your area before starting your next home renovation project.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Marianne Avila on 4/28/2019

Selling a home can be pretty intense and stressful, especially if you haven't done so before. The pressure even becomes greater when you need to close your current sale before you move into a new home. Doing these few things may be the critical little steps you need to take to make that sale happen as fast as you need it.

  • Price your home right Pricing is especially important. A lot of times people price their homes based on what they think they ought to get for the house, but a buyer is only going to pay what he thinks is the value of the house. Pricing right means that your home won't stay for too long on the market—a negative indicator that can slow the sale.
  • Improve the curb appeal Curb appeal refers to how attractive your home looks to people on the outside. Little things like upgrading the exterior paint job, replacing the number plate, doorbell, and other external fittings or even mowing the lawn will all add up to make your house appeal to the buyer looking on from the outside.
  • Take good pictures The old saying is true that goes that a picture is worth more than a thousand words it comes to your house listing. You want to make sure that you avoid unattractive photos. You could use a professional photographer to make sure that your pictures are high quality with adequate lighting. Unless your cell phone camera is super good, you probably shouldn't use it.
  • Arrange your home right The right arrangement of your home might be what is needed to help your buyers make the final decision. Take away your personal touches and lay aside your preferences. The objective is to make it look like a home they can live in, and having too much of your personal items might be a distraction as it makes it harder for them to picture themselves living in a home that still has your pictures on the wall.
  • Write out a great listing copy And while a picture may be worth a thousand words, a picture plus a thousand words, is worth a lot more. A vivid description makes potential buyer of your home have an idea of how living in your home may feel. You should talk about any advantages your neighborhood has, such as proximity to schools or shopping malls. Let the buyer think that your home is unique with your words. If you need assistance with a good description, talk to a professional writer for help.




Categories: Uncategorized  




© 2020 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC.
Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of Columbia Insurance Company, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate. Equal Housing Opportunity. View our Privacy Policy