Marianne Avila - Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Verani Realty



Posted by Marianne Avila on 1/7/2018

As a senior citizen, selling a home and moving to a new location may prove to be difficult. Fortunately, we're here to help you take the guesswork out of packing up your belongings and getting settled into a new address.

Now, let's take a look at three essential moving tips for senior citizens.

1. Plan Ahead

Moving day can be long and stressful, particularly for seniors who don't plan ahead. If you start planning for your move today, you can increase the likelihood of a seamless transition from one address to another.

Think about your belongings and what you'd like to bring to your new address. If you have a wide assortment of items that you won't need at your new home, you can sell, donate or dispose of these items prior to moving day.

Also, if you need to hire a moving company, don't wait until the last minute to do so. Because the longer that you wait to hire a moving company, the less likely it becomes that this company will be available on the date of your move.

2. Secure Your Treasured Belongings

Although you've collected a large assortment of items over the years, you may be unable to bring all of these items to your new address. However, if you sort through your belongings, you can determine which items to keep.

Treasured belongings like antiques, artwork and jewelry generally are keepers. Pack and store these items properly to ensure they won't deteriorate before moving day.

Let's not forget about treasured belongings that have sentimental value, either. Photographs and other treasured possessions should be packed in a safe place and labeled correctly. That way, you'll have no trouble unpacking these precious belongings once you arrive at your new address.

3. Ask Friends and Family Members for Help

When it comes to getting ready for moving day, there is no need to work alone. Senior citizens who reach out to friends and family members for help can streamline the process of preparing for a move and enjoy a one-of-a-kind moving experience.

Friends and family members are loved ones who strive to help you in any way they can. Thus, if you contact friends and family members before moving day, you can work with loved ones to boost the chances of a fast, easy move.

Lastly, if you need extra assistance before you relocate, it never hurts to contact a real estate agent. This housing market professional understands the challenges associated with moving and is happy to help any senior citizen enjoy a stress-free move.

A real estate agent can put you in touch with local moving professionals. Plus, if you need help selling a house, a real estate agent can make it easy to list your residence, host home showings and much more.

Keep things simple as you get ready to move – use the aforementioned moving tips, and any senior can quickly and effortlessly prep for moving day.





Posted by Marianne Avila on 11/20/2016

Whether you have parents that are aging, house guests that are seniors, or if you need to adapt your house for your own needs, most of us will someday start thinking about making our homes a safer place to navigate. Making your home more elder-friendly means more than just installing a ramp to your front door. There are likely many obstacles in your home that can cause problems for those with mobility issues. In this article we'll show you some simple ways to make a home a safer place for seniors and those with limited mobility.

Stairs

Stairs are the most obvious and most important thing to consider when making your home senior friendly. You probably have at least three sets of stairs in your home, but some people have many more. When it comes to making stairs safe for seniors and those with limited mobility you have three main options: Chair lift - If someone needs to get up a long flight of stairs, chair lifts are the most useful item to have in your home. These are expensive additions to a home, however, so you probably wouldn't want to invest in one unless it is a permanent alteration. Ramp -  Ramps are great for outside stairways. At the very least you should have one ramp leading to your house. These can be assembled temporarily as well, which makes having a ramp a good option if you have a house guest with limited mobility. Alter current stairs - All stairs that remain in your home should have sturdy rails. If your stairways don't have any, installing rails is a good idea in general. Steps should have nonstick surfaces. You can buy an adhesive grip at most hardware stores. Rearrange - If your house guest is only staying for a short while it doesn't make sense to build ramps or buy an expensive chair lift. Instead, make sure they can access their bedroom and bathroom all on the ground floor. If that means switching bedrooms for a week, it's a much safer option that making them risk stairways daily.

Bathroom safety

There are a number of small changes you can make in your bathroom to make it more accessible to those with limited mobility. Here are a few that every homeowner should make:
  • Use slip resistant grip in the tub
  • Leave bathroom lights on overnight to avoid trips
  • Install a medical alert button in  the bathroom within reach of the tub
  • Make sure your bathroom door locks can be opened from both sides in case of emergency
  • Practice good communication and awareness

General home safety

Aside from stairs and bathrooms, the home has a number of other dangers that we often take for granted. Some good practices include:
  • Remove slippery rugs from floors
  • Clear walking spaces of clutter, moving furniture if you have to
  • Have your guest let you know or accompany them when they're walking outside on dangerous surfaces
  • Make your guest aware of things like fire extinguishers, telephones, and first aid kits
If you've taken all of these measures, ask your guest what you could do to make them safer and more comfortable in your home.





Posted by Marianne Avila on 2/21/2016

There comes a time when families start to think about senior members moving. Factors such as retirement, finances, lifestyle, health or the distance between family members are just a few of the reasons why seniors may decide to relocate. Moving is a big decision especially when a senior has lived in one place for a very long time. Many things must be considered, including access to health care, recreation, social activities and practical concerns, such as grocery stores, libraries, climate, etc. Access to Quality Care For many seniors access to health care or options for health care assistance is the primary reason for moving. When considering options it is important look at the short-term solutions, but also consider long term scenarios. Options may include drop-in help, moving closer to a family member that can assist when needed or retirement communities that offer fully independent living to supportive assistance as required. Community Services It is also important to research the area community services. You will want to make note of services such as homecare, cleaning services, snow removal, transportation and home repair. Some individuals may want access to volunteer organizations or senior centers where they can be involved in the community. Support As an older adult, moving is an especially difficult transition. Finding the support the senior needs in the new community is imperative. Groups that seniors can connect with will help the transition go smoother. Connect with church groups, home visit solutions or perhaps meetings that would be conducted in a home setting. Here are some websites that may help you in your transition: •Eldercare LocatorAARPElder Web: Online Eldercare SourcebookAmerican Society on Aging (ASA)Senior Resource Housing: Information on Housing Options





Posted by Marianne Avila on 1/17/2016

For many seniors, the idea of selling the home that they have raised a family in can be met with some resistance. And while many seniors are perfectly capable and comfortable taking care of a large home, there are some who would much rather do away with the hassle of home maintenance and lawn upkeep, opting instead to spend their golden years in a more relaxed setting with a more comfortable climate.  If you find yourself thinking about selling your home and settling in greener pastures, then there are a few things you will need to consider.

    • Are you moving because you want to, or because you think that taking care of your home is becoming a burden?
    • Do you want to move closer to family?
    • Is the climate you currently live in aggravating any medical conditions you may have?
Firstly, you must ask yourself what you'd want in your new residence.  Do you want to live in a place where things like lawn care and home maintenance are taken care of for you, or would you just prefer a smaller home?  Would you like to stay within your community, or are you thinking about an out-of-state move?  Florida has long been known for its retirement communities, but places like Arizona and New Mexico are quickly becoming retirement hot spots due to their affordability and warm climate. A few things to consider.
      • Availability and access to medical care
      • Would you like to have access to a swimming pool for exercise?
      • Are you open to the idea of living in an area with group activities?
Once you've settled on a potential destination, it's time to establish how much your home is worth.  A qualified real estate agent can help you through this process. For more moving tips for seniors, please click here. 







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